Academia

Working Draft: Pilot Study (Public/Private/Local/Global)

While I do not usually post drafts of my scholarly papers unlocked online because of "previous publication" issues that journals have as policies (if draft is substantially the same, they don't publish if it's been on the internet in most cases I know about), this draft is such an early version of a pilot project that will be massively revised as I develop the work as part of the Racefail Corpus Project that I decided to go ahead and post it as is, with the handout (linked from this post) in my academic journal.

This pilot project is part of a larger project, now tentatively titled: Mapping Racial Constructions and Identities on the Internet: Creating a Corpus and Computer Tools for Storing and Analyzing Texts for Humanities Research.

Note: Commenting open to all, anonymous will be screened and IP tracking is still on.

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Academia

Table One: Alphabetical List of Topics on Fail_FandomAnon Post 1

Copy of presentation on the first post.

NOTE: I'm doing the analysis of the first post by hand; this project may eventually (grant agencies willing) become part of a larger project in digital humanities. I'm working with a computer scientist and two linguists to develop a conceptual search engine and other programs that can be used to parse and tag text electronically.

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Academia

Table Three: Total Number of Comments on each TOPIC of Fail_Fandomanon Post 1

Working draft

Copy of presentation on the first post.

NOTE: I'm doing the analysis of the first post by hand; this project may eventually (grant agencies willing) become part of a larger project in digital humanities. I'm working with a computer scientist and two linguists to develop a conceptual search engine and other programs that can be used to parse and tag text electronically.



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Table Two: TOpics

Table Three: Comments

Note: Commenting open to all, anonymous will be screened and IP tracking is still on.

This entry was originally posted at http://www.dreamwidth.org/12345.html. Comments are enabled at both sites but anonymous comments will be screened for moderation.
Academia

Bibliography or Bust!

There has been major growth in fan studies (and even more in internet studies--a much larger field of study) in the last few years. It's been a while since I did searches, so I've been doing some, and here are the results.

Caveat #1: I haven't read all these. I won't read them all. I will find some that look relevant to my areas of interest and read them.

Caveat #2: Mostly peer-reviewed scholarship. Just as "art" does not mean "good" or "literature," "ditto," the same is true here.


Part I: Overview of Peer-Reviewed scholarship on Fan Studies

March 6, 2011 search in Academic Search Review.

Part II: Overview of Peer-Reviewed Scholarship on Fan Studies.

Mostly MLA, mostly focusing on fan fiction and the vidding scholarship small as it currently is.

Part III: Overview of Peer-Reviewed Scholarship on Related Topics

Social sciences databases, Internet Communities and Participatory Culture.

Note: these are not cross-posted on my LJ version since the documents are Too. Big.

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Academia

Public/Private/Local/Global: Rhetorics of Social Justice Debates in Anonymous Fan Memes Online

Working on a pilot study on fail_fandomanon for a conference next month.

Have copied/pasted all text from the first entry (July 4) in fail_fandomon into a file, stripping out the LJ formatting and some command text (Link Reply), etc. I worked from the view=flat mode, and the final document in Word is 701 pages long, over 260,000 words.

My next step will be making a text file and working through it with the aid of a marking tool (xml): alas, the tool does not do actual marking! (That's one thing we hope to work with the computer science people on the Digital Humanities grant--i.e. can a program work through a text and mark certain elements!).

If anyone would like a copy of the text file (or the .doc file, though it will be HUGE), drop me a message at Robin_Reid @ tamu-commerce.edu

This is the corpus tool I'm using; http://www.wagsoft.com/CorpusTool/

Here's the abstract for the presentation.

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And here are the categories I'll be inputting into the UAM Corpus marking program (it's an xml marking program, works on binary structure). These categories are not complete--it's just the start after some read-throughs of the text.

UAM lets me set up the categories for marking: I'll be doing a rhetorical version of a linguistics Parse Tree. (The grant we're working on will include both functional grammar and stylistics and rhetorical approaches!). In this case, rather than the syntax of the clauses, I'm marking basic rhetorical purposes of each response as a whole.

The capital letters indicate one marking category; the terms underneath will be options for marking. The method generates quantitative methodology--I'll eventually have a basic list of SUBJECT headers for main thread topics, and also information on rhetorical patterns.

These categories are *incomplete* and will be developed not only over the next few weeks as I work through the text, but in future work in the linguistics lab (this sort of analysis needs others to give feedback on categories and how they're applied!).

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Academia

Digital Humanities Grant (the IRB stage of the process)

The Digital Humanities Grant is due next week--my Co-PI and I have been working on it despite the glacial age that hit for a couple of weeks. Part of the process at this university requires an IRB review (in the case of this project, we'll be working on the scholarship even if the grant isn't funded which is likely--it's the first time we've submitted a grant of this sort, and NEH as the only major humanities grant funding source in the US will receive a gazillion applications--but as I tell my students, the more practice one gets writing grants, the better!.

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Academia

My Grant Writing Syllabus

Besides working on a grant myself (actually two at the moment, both due in the next week or so), I'm also teaching a technical writing (undergraduate course) devoted entirely to grant writing: I expect in the next year or so to develop a graduate course on grant writing in the humanities (which will be offered online!).

Friends have asked for information on the course, so behind the cut is my syllabus. The kicker about this course is that students are spending the semester writing a grant that they could, if they wished, submit at a later date.

They have spent the first month reviewing the textbooks (two how to books on grant writing that are marketed for a general audience, not written as textbooks), writing about what sort of grant they'd like to write (they can do it for their individual educational needs OR in a professional context--since many of our students here work fulltime, a number are planning grants for their workplaces), and finding funding sources. Our university grant writer is going to comment on their ideas for feasibility and funding, and I'm having a fantastic time--the first few weeks were confusing, but there's an enthusiasm and commitment as they begin to explore the possibilities that is fantastic to see!

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It's a writing intensive workshopping course, with the writing assignments based on the parts of a grant the textbooks identify. Students will start turning on work next week, do peer response with other students, and work on revisions with class and my feedback all semester. THe Progress REports are written to me, covering their work on the actual grant (not the project funded by the grant).

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Academia

Lisa Nakamura: Digitizing Race

I'm familiar with Wendy Chun's work (have taught it twice), but have had Nakamura on my "must read" list for a while. So today I went over and snaffled one of her books from my library: I'll need to buy them for scribbling in, but for now, I'm taking notes on my computer.

Since there is very little scholarship on online fandom and race, I have moved to the Internet and Race where there is some more -- I have some bibliographic searches I need to post in a bit -- but I decided to start with Nakamura because Sarah Gatson often references her work!

Her academic web page and some of publications:

Lisa Nakamura

Website Articles: digital piecework: a mockery of creative industries, Neda Soltani, Race, and Digital Labor.

Nakamura, Lisa. Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet. New York: Routledge, 2002.
Nakamura, Lisa, Beth Kolko, and Gilbert Rodman. Race in Cyberspace . Routledge Press, 2000.
"Digital Media in Cinema Journal—1995-2008." Cinema Journal (2009):
Nakamura, Lisa. Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet. University of Minnesota Press, 2007.

What lies behind the text are what I call reading notes: the kind of notes I take on any test I'm going to teach or work with in my scholarship. After I've finished taking the notes (I'm about halfway through the introduction, but am putting it up online because I'll be coming back later to work on it!), I'll write up a summary of the chapter's arguments. The notes are a mix of paraphrase (mine) of main points, and quotes that strike me as important enough to possible use in later work). I also identify scholarship she references because that can be useful down the road.

So far I'm quite liking her connection between nineties neoliberalism (and its colorblindness) and the move to a more graphic-driven Internet (mid-1990s), and her discussion of multi/inter-disciplinarity of visual culture studies which like new media studies still does not deal very much with raced and gendered bodies and subjects. So far, my evaluation is: excellent book! I wish I'd read it earlier! I will have to teach it soon!

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Academia

I just joined Twitter

Because of #MooreandMe, the anti-rape apologist protest that has begun the last few days.

I'm robinannereid over there!

I'm totally new at Twitter (and swore I'd never join), so feel free to um add me, tell me best places, offer free advice, etc!

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